The perfect blog post

April 20, 2012

By Mark McNeely

Is it just me, or are too many wait staff members at nice restaurants seriously overusing the term “perfect” in asking how one is enjoying one’s meal?

“Is everything perfect?” I have been asked in three different establishments in two cities over the past three weeks. “Is the food perfect?” “Is the wine perfect?”

Of course, I always just say yes, instead of the truth, which would be something like, “this is very good. I’m not sure I’ve ever had a perfect meal or a perfect glass of wine. I’ve had excellent meals and wines, but perfect to me means absolutely zero flaws, including the price of the meals and drink.

I am wondering whether the genesis of the use of “perfect” in describing these tasty — but expensive– meals, started when someone thought about the real meaning of asking if someone’s food, drink, or service was “OK” or “alright.” Did someone think “OK” might mean “so-so?”  “Alright” might mean “just okay?”

When I’m asked if things are OK or alright, I usually smile, nod and say “great,” “this is wonderful,” “I love this,” etc., etc. But I never say “perfect.”

Advertisements

One Response to “The perfect blog post”

  1. Rebecca Leonard Says:

    From experience in the restaurant industry, having a third generation of family owned restaurants, and also from studying corporate culture, I think the idea of asking if the meal is perfect comes from behind the scene training. I’m sure by the restaurants standard they dont want the guests dining experience to be ok, or great, or even spectacular. They want their guests experience to be flawless and perfect. They themselves want to do a perfect job of upholding what that company thinks is the perfect dining experience. When you hear it, you compare it to what your perfect dining experience is, not the restaurants. Maybe a little more research on what makes the clients experience perfect would help. That or a simple change in polished speech.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: